Beef

When choosing a cut of beef it is important to remember that the different parts of the animal are suitable for their own particular styles of cooking. In general, this means that tender cuts with little connective tissue should be cooked in dry heat (grilling, roasting and frying), whilst fibrous cuts with more connective tissue need slow, gentle cooking in moist heat (stewing, braising or boiling).

In this section, we take a look at each of the major cuts of beef, with advice on the methods that should be used to cook them.

 
Brisket
A cut of meat from the breast or lower chest, ideal for pot roasting or braising ...
Dried Beef
Preserved beef from around the world, including bresaola, jerky, biltong and bündnerfleisch ...
Flank
A look at thick flank (top rump) and thin flank (skirt) ...
Leg
A great cut for making stews, casseroles and consommé ...
Loin
Everything you need to know about sirloin and fillet, along with information about steaks cut from the loin, such as chateaubriand, T-bone, filet mignon and porterhouse ...
Marrow
Great for flavouring gravies, soups, stocks and sauces ...
Neck
A sinewy cut used for stews, casseroles and stock ...
Rib
Made up of the fore rib, the thin rib and the thick rib; and ideal cut for roasting, stewing, braising and frying ...
Salted Beef
A look at salt beef, corned beef and pastrami ...
Shin
A tough cut of meat, ideal for braising or stewing ...
Shoulder
Chuck and blade - ideal for braising and stewing ...
Topside and Silverside
Lean, boneless cuts taken from the inside (topside) or outside (silverside) of the hind legs ...