Lamb

The word 'lamb' is generally used to describe the meat from a sheep aged between one month and one year, although in the UK, it is more commonly used for animals slaughtered between 3 and 9 months. Meat from sheep older than 12 months is called hogget; older still and it becomes mutton.

The colour, texture and flavour of the meat changes as the animal ages; spring lamb has a pale pink flesh, whereas summer and autumn lamb is slightly darker. Hogget and mutton is darker still, with a stronger flavour.

In this section, we take a look at the types of cuts of lamb available, along with advice on how to cook them.

 

Related Articles

  • Choosing Lamb
  • Cooking Meat
  • Lamb Recipes
Best End of Neck
Also known as rack of lamb, this tasty joint can be used to make cutlets, noisettes, Guard of Honour or crown roast ...
Breast
An economical, slightly fatty cut, suitable for braising or roasting ...
Chump End
A tasty cut for roasting or for producing succulent chump chops ...
Leg
Leg of lamb (or gigot) - use whole for roasting, butterflied for barbecuing, or divided into shanks for braising and chops for grilling ...
Loin
Buy whole for roasting, or divided into loin chops for grilling or frying ...
Middle Neck
An ideal cut for making delicious hotpots, stews and tagines ...
Neck (Scrag)
A fatty, gristly cut, scrag end of neck can be used chopped, diced or minced to make stews and pies ...
Noisettes
Small rounds of tender lamb ideal for grilling or frying ...
Saddle
A double loin roast, from both sides of the backbone ...
Shoulder
A flavourful cut suitable for roasting whole, or for mincing to use in dishes such as moussaka or shepherd's pie ...
Smoked Mutton
Delicious when eaten raw on flatbread or braised with root vegetables ...