Veal

Veal is the meat taken from calves - particularly the male offspring of dairy cattle. It has a light, delicate taste, a tender texture and is the perfect vehicle for strong and piquant or subtle and creamy flavours.

Like beef, cuts of veal vary according to the butchery methods used in different countries. However, most follow the French style of butchery, which involves trimming away all sinew and gristle and then separating the meat neatly along the natural seams in the muscles.

In this section, we take a look at each of the resultant cuts, along with some handy cooking tips and tricks.

 

Related Articles

  • Choosing Veal
Best End of Neck
You can roast this joint whole or divide it into neck cutlets ...
Breast and Flank
Ideal for boning, rolling, stuffing, and then roasting ...
Chump
Great for braising or slow roasting ...
Escalope
Find out which cut of veal gives the best escalopes ...
Fillet
The most tender of all the cuts of veal ...
Knuckle
The perfect cut for making rich, gelatinous dishes such as osso buco ...
Leg
A look at the two major leg joints: the hock end and the fillet end ...
Loin
A lean joint for roasting, or for cutting into chops to grill or fry ...
Middle Neck
An economical cut, producing veal cutlets and meat for pies and stews ...
Neck (Scrag)
An inexpensive cut, used for stews, casseroles and stuffings ...
Shoulder
Great for roasting or for making into fricassée or blanquette ...